Article One Crowdsources NPE’s

In a blog post at law.com Lisa Schuchman reports that Article One Partners is offering a valuable service to patent infringement defendants by crowdsourcing prior art to its “community” of researchers:

“… {the}“community” is comprised of 24,000 researchers from around the world who look for relevant material that might serve as ammunition to invalidate a patent (researchers are paid for their work using a reward model). Their ability to quickly find sometimes-obscure information—even, at times, in other languages—that can help a client fend off a patent suit has helped Article One become increasingly popular. Technology companies, which have been targeted more and more by competitors and non-practicing entities (also known as “patent trolls”), are particularly drawn to the company’s services, although pharmaceutical companies and medical device makers are also clients… says. In fact 18 of the top 25 companies most frequently targeted by NPEs are Article One clients, as are 30 of the Fortune Global 500….”

So, we have the AIA, Section 101 defense, crowdsourcing prior art through Article One and the recently announced PTO effort. Soon, passage of the Shield Act? Is the window slowly closing on NPE’s (well other than IV, Acacia, etc.)?

Article One’s researcher payment is also intriguing:

“In Article One’s business model, successful researchers are rewarded for their work, receiving $5,000-$10,000 for the prior art they dig up. In the three years it’s been in existence, Article One has awarded more than $3 million to its researchers, Milone said. The company, named for Article One of the U.S. Constitution, which includes the patent and copyright clause, also pays out five percent of its profits to community members.”

Who doesn’t wish they had thought up Article One’s business model?

For much more, go to this link: http://www.law.com/corporatecounsel/PubArticleCC.jsp?id=1202574469095&Article_One_Arms_Companies_With_Prior_Art_for_Patent_Battles&slreturn=20120911120733

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Patent Litigation, Patents

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s